Q&A with Candidates – 2 of 2

Question 1 – Which Committee(s) do you think would be a good fit for you and why?

Lynda Mantler: I am eager to work diligently where needed should I be a successful board candidate. Areas I feel I would be able to contribute best are: 

Marketing Committee – Continue with the Junior Participant pin and CanAm shirt competitions.  Incent Junior Participants by bringing in extra recognition for them; bring a wider array of NAFA branded products available to competitors and judges.  Smaller items could be offered for purchase as tournament prizes. 

Judges Committee – Regular dialogue with judges as they are often first to see issues that need to be addressed.  Ensure we properly equip our judges with meaningful training and trust them to do the job.  Provide a prompt response when NAFA is made aware of issues brought forward by judges, competitors and RDs. 

Technology committee – There are some people out there in the flyball community who have great ideas and are working on ways to improve technology such as the way stats are recorded at tournaments.  Let’s get them talking with the technology committee.  

Election Committee – Continue to explore ways to engage our constituents in the process.  Encourage interested competitors to run for election.  Ideally, NAFA would have representation from many geographic areas. 

Executive Committee – I am currently serving as secretary and would love to continue in that capacity.  Having the minutes available to be read as soon as possible is an important part of communication with the flyball community. 

Emma Mak:  First, I would like to continue on the Rules Committee, as I’ve been a member since 2017 and chair of that committee since 2018, so I bring experience, as well as my in-depth knowledge of the NAFA database and things like regional, NAFA and ROCC calculations to the table. There will be rule changes coming based on the new measuring system rollout, and as a co-chair of the Special Measuring Committee (tasked with coming up with recommendations for the rollout for the board), I’m well positioned to steer the Rules Committee as we make the necessary adjustments to the rules.

Last year I chaired the newly formed NAFAblog Committee, and would like to continue working on that as the articles produced are a means of engaging the flyball community, as well as a way of attracting new flyballers by featuring clubs that are looking for new members and/or offering lessons.

I would also like to continue as a member of the Technology Committee, as I’m NAFA’s statistician and have the most in-depth knowledge of the database. The committee will continue to focus on further development of new EJS components, as well as longterm plans for moving the sport forward with tournaments becoming paperless. In the shortterm, I’ve been using a great online scoring program developed by a competitor at my club’s tournaments, and hope to see if NAFA can make this available. I would also like to see the website be updated to use WordPress so as to become more easily updateable and compatible with mobile devices.

Jayne McQuillen:  I think I would be a good fit for the Rules, Marketing, Disciplinary, Technology Committees.  I am already on the Communications & NAFA Blog Committees.  I am a good fit for the Rules Committee because as a Regional Director, I have to be very familiar with the Rulebook.  Competitors routinely asked about rules, rule changes, and interpretations of the rules.  I have discussed many rule related issues with judges, the Executive Director, and sent items to the BOD for further clarification.  I also drafted the RD Handbook which required sifting through the Rulebook to narrow down which rules specifically apply to the RD.  I think I would be a good fit with the Disciplinary Committee because I do know the rules and have dealt with issues further forward!  While I am thrilled with the new EJS system in development, I think there is more technology that NAFA can continue to make improvements.  Technology also involves websites, databases and any emerging avenue we can utilize to make competing or hosting a tournament easier.  Tying technology into Marketing & Communications efforts is a good way to make sure NAFA doesn’t miss out on new ways to keep the sport modern and relevant.on the ground as an RD.  I have a strong interest in marketing the sport of flyball.  To me, marketing is not just making people aware of flyball and aware of NAFA.  We need a more concentrated effort to not just make people aware of the sport, but to help clubs turn them into competitors.  We also need more support to help with club development in areas where there are no existing clubs.   Last, I love technology and I would love to help push the sport

Alex Le: I can add value to any committee but would love to be a part of the Technology Committee.  Given my background with the firms here in silicon valley, I can help drive some strong relationships to help with building a better website or even partnering with vendors to help streamline costs for streaming during our CanAm tournament.  I know alot of work goes into building our new lights and would love to help out where I can.

Question 2: What things have you done to help Flyball in general and NAFA specifically in the past?

Alex Le: I have loved flyball ever since I discovered it with my first labrador retriever.  He was never the fastest but he enjoyed his time playing and I enjoyed meeting so many incredible people all over the US, Canada and now throughout the larger flyball community accross the world.  I’ve been a huge advocate for the sport and driving new members by teaching beginner flyball classes and encouraging new participants to try the sport whenever they see us practicing or working foundational skills.  I am currently a member of the Communications committee and would love to be more involved to help provide additional transparency or in whatever capacity is needed to help NAFA grow.

Jayne McQuillen: As a 20+ year competitor and team owner, a lot of what I have done is on the ground level.  First and foremost, I have offered the opportunity to learn the sport to people in my local area. Being willing to teach classes, to train new dogs off the street and get people excited about the sport is really important!  As the team owner I’ve overseen Skidmarkz growth from 8 people in 2002 to 20 people today, most of whom were brand new to the sport of flyball.  My husband and I have built own flyball training building, which we rent out to other local clubs and individuals.  That enables more people to practice without investing in lots of equipment.  We also have hosted fun matches as an opportunity for local clubs to get tournament like experience.  As a Regional Director, I’ve also helped put on an Open House, in the largest Metro area of Iowa.  This helped the first Des Moines Area flyball club get great exposure to interested people and there are now 2 clubs in that area!  I try to provide connections for mentorship, training and equipment resources to help those teams starting out.  On a regular basis I am contacted about clubs in our region and send interested people to the nearest clubs.  I try to maintain an accurate contact list and know which clubs are teaching classes and/or accepting new members.  I work to maintain an active, informative and fun regional Facebook page that keeps competitors up to date. Recently I started a Facebook group for flyball just in the St Louis, MO area.  There has been a continual stream of interest in flyball in that area, but no active clubs.  My hope is to organize a similar Open House style event in that area, when it’s safe to do so.  Hopefully, this will jumpstart club development in what was a hotbed of flyball years ago.  I have tried to increase NAFA’s profile by participating in the Purina Pro Plan Incredible Dog Challenge and I followed up by contacting local news outlets to promote the airing of that show, as well as the sport of flyball in my area.  I’ve also a volunteer with the Communications Committee and the Special Measuring Committee.  

Emma Mak:  I feel very strongly about NAFA flyball. Before my last three years on the board, I was a non-board committee member on the Rules Committee, Technology Committee and Election Committee for several years. I’m also a Co-Regional Director for Region 2, working mainly on the non-event duties, such as approving sanctioning and schedules. I think one of the best ways to contribute to NAFA is to host tournaments! I’ve been a Tournament Director and/or Tournament Secretary for my club for a few years hosting popular, themed events in our region.

Lynda Mantler:  I have helped organize and participated in many public flyball demonstrations such as fairs, Canada Day celebrations, Giants lacrosse games and even for a church group! I also was one of the organizers and trainers for introductory flyball lessons for many different sessions over the years. We handed out flyers that were produced by our club and also the NAFA brochures. And of course, I talk about flyball to anyone I meet who does not know about it!

I have a strong work ethic.  Over the years I have done a lot of volunteering to help clubs at tournaments.  I love to work as line judge, on the timing table or wherever I am needed.   I have served as tournament director and tournament secretary and had a few opportunities to sub in for our Regional Director.  All great learning experiences!

For NAFA, I have served on the Board of Directors for the past four years and have had excellent attendance at meetings.  I have worked on:

  • Disciplinary Committee and have been working on an ad hoc committee regarding procedures for Unsportsmanlike Charges.
  • Judges Committee – working on the committee to oversee education requirements, development of new judges and advancement of judges.
  • Executive Committee – In my role as secretary, I have worked at getting the board of directors meeting minutes out in a timely fashion. Having the minutes available for participants to read is part of the efforts to help communication. 
  •  Special Measuring Committee – the committee goals are: 
  • Make Measuring Easier for Competitors, Judges and RDs
  • Make Measuring Consistent
  • Ensure fair checks and balances in the overall process
  • Chair of the Marketing Committee.  Working on the ongoing yearly projects and looking to expand on that as noted above. 
  • I have brought forward ideas from competitors and some of them have been approved by the board and implemented. 

Working at CanAm to support the event.  My job the past few years was organizing volunteers to ensure we had people to work on the timing tables, line and box judge positions for up to 7 rings.  On race days, it means getting everyone to their position on time and organizing breaks and lunches for everyone so racing can run smoothly.  I spent a lot of time doing all of these jobs as required.  It meant long days of being on the go (38,000 steps one day), but it was a challenge and a great feeling to accomplish this. 

Question 3: Open – Anything you would like to add as a closing statement for your Board of Directors candidacy?

Lynda Mantler: Why vote for me:  Passion for the cause:  FLYBALL!

I will support the flyball community and express my opinion at meetings

I will diligently prepare ahead for each meeting.  I will make the time to do this.

Eager to serve on committees.

I will bring your ideas and concerns forward to the board

I enjoy serving organizations that I am involved with.  I have prior board experience having served on nonprofit flyball and community club boards and various industry boards.  I have served as secretary and treasurer and director at large. 

Some people excel at flyball skills training.  That is not my forte, however, I feel I have much to contribute to the board of directors. 

I realize that the status quo is not good enough in organizations.  If we stay the way we are, we are actually falling behind other organizations that are making advancements and taking some of our members.  We need to continue to evolve and improve.  There is competition out there which definitely makes us better.  We need people who are open minded and willing to make changes that will make our sport better.  i.e., new awards, new tournament formats, new technology, exploring ideas from competitors. 

We all need a fresh start every year. It’s important that we go into the New Year with an open mind and a new way of thinking. I am really looking forward to racing again.  It has been a long time since most of us have been able to see our flyball friends and feel the excitement of competition.  I am an optimist and believe we will make flyball work in 2021.  It may not be the way we want it to be at first, but we will get back into the lanes in some fashion and appreciate every bit of it.   

The final date to vote is January 13.  Please be sure to cast your vote and vote for Lynda 😊  I would be honored to serve on your behalf.  

Thank you!

Emma Mak:  I’d just like to say thank you to those that are taking an interest in our responses to these questions and those posed in the live chat. I hope to continue serving on the board during this difficult yet exciting time, as we move towards re-opening and rolling out a new, robust measuring system. Looking forward to seeing you all in the lanes when we can be together again!

Jayne McQuillen:  I thank everyone for taking the time to get to know all of the NAFA Candidates.  I see volunteering on the NAFA BOD as way that I can give back to the sport that has given so much to my family & I.  I have already stepped up and volunteered as an RD, and on several Committees.  Overall, I hope everyone has gotten a sense of how much I value promoting this sport to anyone.  Current flyballers obviously know the sport and love it.  However, I think there is a missing link between people knowing that Flyball exists and people having the opportunity to train & compete in it.  I know many flyballers have had the chance to try out new sports in the last year due to COVID.  The opportunity was there to try those sports out, when it’s safe, Flyball needs to be just as easy to try out.  We all can make sure we grow our own sport by not turning away interested people.  We can increase participation, grow teams, grow clubs and in the end grow tournaments by helping make sure the sport is accessible.  I also invite anyone who has questions for me to email mcjayne@yahoo.com.         

Alex Le:  Thank you so much for taking the time to read and consider all the candiates.  There are some amazing people here that will be able to provide great support for the board and help NAFA grow into a great organization.  I am so excited, as I am sure everyone else is, about getting back into the ring for racing and seeing all my friends again in 2021.  I understand that change is difficult and hard and we’ve all been through alot in 2020.  I hope that everyone takes a look at my strong background in management and my comitment to providing transparency and support to all players.  As a board member, you have my promise to bring you transparency, to ensure that you will be listened to and that your concerns and issues are addressed.  This is the way to help all of us create a great NAFA organization.

Q&A with Candidates – 1 of 2

Question 1: Why do you want to be a member of the NAFA Board of Directors?

Alex Le: The primary reason to serve on a Board of Director is to meaningfully contribute to serving an organization.  That’s a pretty typical answer.

I am a leader.  I’ve managed large scale silicon valley projects, large budgets, led diverse teams and spent countless hours in meetings and conference calls to deal with emergencies and put out situational fires.  It’s in my DNA, and its been one of the most rewarding experiences of my professional life.

BUT I also believe NAFA may be in need of a strong go getter within the Board.  We want to continue to ensure that we challenge the current flyball players but also effectively reach the new ones that are joining the sport.  Getting these folks to engage and participate requires us to build trust through our transparency while being able to allow NAFA to adapt and move into a more diverse and connected flyball community.

Cultural organizational changes are challenging and scary…. And I want to help NAFA embrace new perspectives and views.  I come with solutions and can bring action oriented common sense to help move NAFA through my skills in technology, communication transparency, partnerships, and building engagement with our flyball players.

Jayne McQuillen: I have always believed you should give back to the organizations that you enjoy participating in if you want them to continue to be there for you to enjoy.  Having worked with various volunteer run organizations, I am well aware that there is a need for hard working, thoughtful people to keep moving the organization forward. 

Emma Mak: I am running for my second term as a board member because I enjoy giving back to NAFA flyball; the sport has brought me so many positive things in my life: great friends, great dogs, and a sense of community. I like working on a team with the other board members and ED, all of whom also have a great passion for flyball and for helping people. I feel my strengths which include working out the details of how something can be implemented, being determined to get things done in a timely manner, and having leadership skills add value to the board.

Lynda Mantler: As a current member of the board, I want to continue to support and contribute to the sport I am so passionate about. I have received so much from the awesome experiences I have had during my time in flyball and have made lifelong friends. I want to be involved and give back to the sport.  I Iike to know what is going on and I find work on the NAFA board very interesting and challenging. The board needs many points of view and I am not afraid to speak up at meetings and state my opinions.  It’s important to have views from all the various regions.  I enjoy being part of a team that I can contribute to. 

Question 2: What is the one thing you would like to see changed, added or removed and why?

Lynda Mantler: An overhaul of the entire measuring process has been top of mind. This is being actioned now by a special measuring committee and will be resolved in the coming months, so I will choose another topic. 

An idea for when racing resumes…introduce sanctioned pairs and singles racing on a trial basis.   Tournaments will likely be smaller when we can begin racing again.  This would enable the host club to offer another class of racing to help with entry fees and add revenue for NAFA as well. 

Some advantages of trying this out: 

  • Fewer people in the ring at a time
  • Set aside a specific time frame for when these races are run, ie. lunch time and after the teams racing has finished.  That would allow some competitors to come into the venue only when they are racing.
  • After the long period when we haven’t been racing, there will be dogs that can complete the course but are not ready to race on a team.  It would give them exposure in a tournament environment.
  • It would give competitors the opportunity to have their dog’s time recorded on the EJS
  • Suited for competitors whose club can’t field a team but have members that still want to come out and race
  • This could work for clubs that can field a team but don’t have enough for multiple teams.  The dogs not on a team could race in singles and pairs. 
  • Dogs would run fewer heats than dogs on a team, so it would work for dogs that need to work up to full time racing again

Monitor the success of the new offering and invite feedback.

Emma Mak:  I want to see improvements to the measuring system implemented. I’m currently co-chair of the Special Measuring Committee and we’re presenting a plan for a fully realized mandatory measuring system to the board by the end of this year. The plan will realize three goals:

  1. Making measuring easier for competitors, Judges and RDs.
  2. Making sure measuring is consistent across regions.
  3. Ensuring for checks and balances in the overall process.

Measuring has long been a point of frustration for NAFA’s competitors, and implementing a plan that meets these three goals needs to happen so NAFA can move forward and put this divisive issue behind us.

Jayne McQuillen: I would like to see improvements in NAFA’s technology.  At the bare minimum, a modernized website that is more user friendly.  I think it especially needs more appeal to people who are trying to find out about the sport.  Along with that, I would like to see a move to more electronic record keeping for tournaments.  I know Alex Le has some great ideas on that front that are already being implemented at tournaments in his area.  

Alex Le: Ohhh, tought one.  I do see, from the past few years, that there is a changing population participating in flyball.  With this comes advances in the way we play the sport and as the sport grows,  we get these incredible faster times and each year, a new crop of participants join the fun.

For us to move NAFA into the next stage, we need to be able to embrace collaborative problem solving.  The organization needs to be able to adjust to the changing environment and let go of the zero sum game, where someone has to lose in order for you to win.  Where collaborative problem solving occurs, innovation follows.

If we work together to solve problems and take on insights and perspectives from our members, we grow together to represent everyone involved.  As an example, I recently proposed that we review our website and as COVID events unfolded, offered a plan to help NAFA move into a more responsive communication standard and transparency, in addition to improving our web site and infrastructure.  I don’t come with complaints; I always come prepared with solutions and partnership with large organizaitons who are willing to help us solve problems and improve the way NAFA responds to members and provide needed transparency.

Question 3: How would you deal with a situation in which you have a strong opinion on a topic/issue brought up for a Board of Directors vote and the majority of the Board disagrees with you?

Alex Le: I believe this question should be stated as how would the current Board of Directors feel if the majority of the people from NAFA disagrees with the Board.  

Disagreements and differing perspectives are the hallmark of democracy and our growth as an organization.  I am not asking to be a Board member to further my own interests; I am running to be a NAFA board member, as I’ve alluded to in my answers, to represent the folks on the ground who play flyball with NAFA and who spend countless hours trainning and travelling and participating in dog sports to spend time with their dogs and their friends.  

Being in a leadership position means you have to be able to practice critical listening skills and be able to translate that into a prespective that will allow the organization to grow as changes are inevitable and change can be good.  In my professional life and personal life, I am keen on hearing all perspectives and am very good at understanding all sides of an issue.  If there is a disagreement, I plan on being connected enough to the NAFA players and participants to give them a voice at the table.  

If the there is a strong disagreement from the Board on an issue at hand, I plan on being able to articulate the different perspective and represent the diversity that exists from the NAFA participants.  I want to make sure that even if the issue vote is not the decision for the majority of the Board, the different views and diversity of the minority perspective and the members’ views are not under valued or that the voices are not being heard.  To me, the NAFA Board needs to represent all of NAFA participants; we need to be more effective at ensuring that we elevate different voices, integarte these contrasting insights and that we always welcome conversations, even if they are difficult ones to have. 

Jayne McQuillen: I fully recognize that my thoughts are not the only thoughts on any topic, being a board member means you have to be willing to compromise, adjust thinking and work to move forward any decision.  Board members can all have their own opinions, but that doesn’t mean your way is the only way.  You can set aside your opinion to work toward group goals.

Emma Mak: The Board of Directors is made up of nine people from various clubs, regions, and backgrounds, who want to do what is best for NAFA. I’m not someone to hold back my opinion for what I think is best for the organization, but if the majority of the board disagrees and wants to go a different way – I will support the final decision. When discussing a topic/issue, it’s good to have respectful disagreement among board members, as considering different view points, and looking at an issue from all sides are key to coming to the best decision for the organization. Once the decision is made, it’s important to move past any disagreement and work as a cohesive team to communicate and implement the results of that decision.

Lynda Mantler: This is bound to happen when there are differing opinions as there needs to be on any board. I have experienced this and what I did was express my opinion and the reasons for it to ensure that what I believed was understood.    When the vote went in a direction I did not agree with, I respected that my view was not that of the majority.   It did not stand in the way of me earnestly working towards the outcome for the project that had been decided on.  I contributed within the guidelines provided and focused on the positive aspects of the project. In the end, I felt a sense of accomplishment for doing this.

Getting to Know the Candidates: Alex Le

Alex is a proven leader and has held leadership positions in Business Strategy, Information Technology Management, and Program/Portfolio Management.  He is a lawyer by training and currently serves on multiple boards including co-chair of the HRC fund raising committee and an active member of the Fair Oaks City Council in his community.  For NAFA, Alex is currently on the Communications Committee. 

He comes from a strong management consulting background, having worked for the top 5 professional services and consulting organizations and currently works with a Silicon Valley startup in CA to help drive program management processes and implement best practices.  This background to driving engagement and transparency to constituents is an asset that he can bring to NAFA. 

Alex is running for NAFA Board as a new member to bring a much-needed injection of insight and execution to help the Board fulfil its vision and further the flyball sport within the dog sports community.  Alex brings awareness and understanding of new members that have joined the flyball community, seeking a fun and energetic activity for their dogs.  With this comes the socialization aspect of flyball events and an opportunity to meet others who share these interests.  A Board that understands and reflects these values and interests of ALL their members is key to a successful growth of flyball and NAFA.  To this end, Alex will be running on 3 key components that he will bring to NAFA: Transparency, Fairness, and Modernization. 

As we grow as an organization, change is inevitable, and Alex will bring the sharpness of his ability to solve problems and targeted execution to help NAFA move forward into its next phase.  We must, as an organization, re engage flyballers and do so in a systematic approach that will drive those key engagement interests from ALL our members.  A NAFA future with a strong structure to provide members with transparency and use of technology to modernize how we play the game will be the key to our success as an organization.  This way of thinking and commitment to our members will keep all of us competing with our dogs in NAFA and make our time with NAFA a top notch flyball experience.

Getting to Know the Candidates: Jayne McQuillen

My name is Jayne McQuillen and I am running for the NAFA Board of Directors.  

I was introduced to flyball in the fall of 1998, when a flyball competitor adopted one of my foster dogs.  She invited us to a practice and a few short months later, our dog was in the ring!  A year later, we needed a second dog for my husband to play with.  We eat, breathe, sleep flyball now!  I never would have imagined that 20 years later we would still be enamored with the sport.  As a bonus, we are sharing that love with our eight year old daughter.  The big attraction for us is just having fun with our dogs, however, we found a second family with our club and supportive community of fellow dog lovers.  

I am currently the club owner of Skidmarkz Flyball Club, Regional Director for Region 21, a volunteer with the NAFA Communications Committee and the new Special Measuring Committee (SMC).  I volunteered to draft the first version of the new Regional Director’s manual.  Which is a great help for new & existing Regional Directors, as often the responsibilities of the position were passed by word of mouth.  It also helps provide uniformity across regions and well as transparency to competitors about the role of Regional Director.  I am very excited to be involved with the (SMC), the new measuring device looks very promising.  We are working to make sure the measuring process is easy for competitors and clearly communicated.  As the Regional Director of an active and growing region, I have tried very hard to help new people find clubs to play on and helped new clubs develop from scratch.  Having the opportunity to fill these volunteer roles with NAFA has given a great insight into the complexity of issues facing the NAFA BOD.

In my real life, I work part time as an Administrative Assistant, which allows me time to delve into lots of other interests.  I spent 18 years involved in Australian Shepherd Breed Rescue organizations.  Helping first with a large national group, ARPH, as a foster home, Regional Representative for Iowa and a BOD member.  I was the founder of a smaller Midwest based rescue group, Protégé Canine Rescue where I also served for ten years as President.  Working in non-profit animal welfare organizations required a great deal of people skills, compromise and flexibility.  I currently run a business teaching dog training focused on performance skills.  COVID-19 has added new challenges to that.  Thankfully out of the box thinking has enabled me to find new ways to teach in these difficult times.

 My primary reason for running for the NAFA BOD is to utilize my diverse experience to grow the sport of flyball by creating a competitive environment that is accessible to everyone.  I have trained a broad array of dogs, some slow, some fast, some steady and some unreliable, and have dogs who fit in every category.  My club once could barely field 2 lineups, and barely ran under 24 seconds.  We have grown to a much larger team, with a wider variety of dogs.  Currently, I have one of the fastest dogs on the team, as well as one of the slowest which provides a great contrast in training and competing.  I believe whether it is a dog, team, or club that everyone deserves equal treatment and to have their interests represented in a fair way.  So many times those pet owners do go on to become the fiercest of competitors.  Many times they just find what I did, a fun outlet for their dogs and a fun group of dog lovers.  I really want NAFA to focus on making sure the bread & butter competitors are not taken for granted. 

Getting to Know the Candidates: Emma Mak

READY?!! It’s one of the best sounds on Earth, as the teams watch the lights for racing to begin…I’ve been playing flyball for eighteen years, and STILL find the sights and sounds thrilling.

In 2001, I told my friend that we were getting a miniature poodle puppy, and she said–Oh, you should do flyball with him!–we need height dogs. We went out to a practice and I’d never seen anything like it. It was fascinating to see dogs put the sequence of moves together. I couldn’t wait to see if Jonah could learn it. After about a year, we were in the lanes and Jonah was absolutely loving it…he would actually glance over at the dog in the other lane and try to beat it back.

Since then my family of people and dogs has grown significantly: Gord and I now have four kids and five dogs, most of whom participate in various ways in flyball. We are members of SpringLoaded, which is based in Niagara region, Ontario. Our club hosts multiple tournaments a year, where we have themes and encourage people to unleash their weirdness and dress-up–and maybe even dance a bit to our awesome tunes. I’ve been a Tournament Director and/or Secretary for most of our events. Hosting can be exhausting for a club, but it’s also SO much fun, especially when your teammates like to be creative and put their own special spin on the events.

We all know flyball is the best dog sport: it’s the only team sport and this means you get a whole new group of people to care about—your team, and beyond that, your ‘flyball family’ from all over North America. Over the years I’ve done work maintaining the NAFA database and it gave me some insight into the NAFA board work and committees. I’ve volunteered time on Election, Rules and Technology Committees to give back to the flyball community that’s brought me so much. I finally got up the nerve to run for the board in 2018.

I’m now the NAFA Vice Chairman, and chair of the Rules Committee and NAFAblog Committee. In my first term, one of my favourite accomplishments has been working with volunteers, Dede Crough and
Jayne McQuillen, to get the NAFAblog started as a way to engage the flyball community, and feature clubs looking for new members. My current main focus is as co-chair of the Special Measuring Committee (SMC), with Cindy Henderson. We are a nine-member team tasked with providing the board with a fully realized plan, by December 31st, 2020, for implementing a new measuring system that accomplishes three goals:

  1. Making measuring easier for competitors, Judges and RDs.
  2. Making sure measuring is consistent across regions.
  3. Ensuring for checks and balances in the overall process.

As the SMC works on the rest of the full plan, we’re keeping the feedback we’ve received from competitors, RDs, and judges front and centre. We know that competitors want to move on from the measuring issues of the past, and we’re determined to get it done.

Thanks for taking the time to read this to get to know me better. I hope you’ll consider supporting me in a second term as a board member. Wishing you all the best and look forward to seeing you in the lanes once flyball resumes. Stay safe!

Getting to Know the Candidates: Lynda Mantler

Hello fellow flyball fanatics, 

I am running for a second term on the NAFA board because I am passionate about flyball.  When I started out, I never expected it would come to this!  I was just looking to get my dog into agility so we could have an activity to do over the winter months when it was cold and wet outside when I got home from work every day. 

The agility class was full so I enrolled my Weimaraner in flyball lessons.  It seemed like a fine sport to me but my dog was crazy about it so I continued on and joined the flyball and agility club.  Then we started competing and I saw that competitors spent their entire weekend running flyball.  That seemed extreme to me but before long, I was spending my weekends at tournaments,  helping with club lessons, working on the board of the club and planning all my vacations around tournaments. 

That was 20 years ago!  As with most hobbies you get into, there is so much more than at first meets the eye.

I have run on fast teams and slower teams; open and regular.  I’ve enjoyed travelling to other provinces and states, and while each region definitely has its own flavour, one thing that is constant is that teams crate together, delight in camaraderie, share food, love their dogs and have a great time in the lanes. 

I am a member of Run Free Flyball Club in Aldergrove, BC in Region 7; British Columbia, Oregon, Washington.  We host a tournament every year and I have been tournament secretary since joining the club.  We always add a little extra fun to the tournament by making up games, contests and awards. 

I realize that people have different reasons they love flyball and I understand the rewards available for dogs and competitors in all divisions.  Flyball matters for all people and all dogs. 

As my involvement in the sport grew, I became very interested in anything to do with organizing and working at tournaments which evolved into my interest in serving on the NAFA board. 

My experience in my worklife has been largely managerial.  I have served on numerous industry and community boards. 

My duties on the board have included the Disciplinary Committee, Judges Committee, Executive Committee in my capacity as secretary and Chair of the Marketing Committee.  I’ve attended CanAm every year that I have been on the board, working and supporting the tournament. 

Being on the board has brought an understanding of the magnitude of work and sacrifices that board members undertake to make flyball fair for all regions.  I feel very privileged to be working on behalf of NAFA competitors. 

I am currently on the Special Measuring Committee to review the entire measuring process from the device through to the actual measuring of dogs at tournaments and recommend to the NAFA BoD a new comprehensive program and process for measuring.  It will be great to finally get this resolved and roll out the plan.  NAFA needs to keep moving ahead to stay relevant in the dog sport world. 

I miss flyball so much and am anxiously waiting to get back in the lanes.  We have a great flyball community.  I’m really looking forward to seeing all the people and dogs again! 

Thanks for reading.  I hope you will consider voting for me in this election. 

Lynda Mantler

Maintaining Canine Fitness During Flyball Hiatus – PART 2 of 2

Authors: Keri Evers-McQuiggan, Lisa DosPassos, Emma Mak

In the second part of this series of how to keep our flyball dogs fit during this time off, we’re looking at our last two (4 & 5) canine fitness topics: how to keep a veteran dog fit and healthy, and suggestions for exercises to help prevent injuries in the future. Check out our previous article (1 to 3) that looked at how to keep your dog fit when you have limited space, a weekly program for canine fitness, and how to teach behaviors geared specifically for puppy fitness.

Our contributors to this series are all NAFA competitors and have certifications in the canine fitness/rehab/conditioning field. The advice given here deals with general exercises, and should not be taken as specific medical advice for your dog.

4How do I keep my veteran dog fit and healthy?

Contributor: Keri Evers-McQuiggan, DVM, CCRP, Niagara Canine Conditioning Centre in Niagara, ON

Club and Region: Keri runs with SpringLoaded in Region 2

Keri has been playing flyball for 17 years and currently runs with her 3.9s Boston Terrier, Bacardi Breezer.

The good news is that even with this prolonged layoff from flyball, our dogs haven’t lost a lot of fitness . . . provided they have been maintaining a moderate level of activity. Veteran dogs certainly know the game, so missing out on practices and competitions is not a concern regarding loss of skills. The most important things are keeping them limber and ready for action so that they don’t hurt themselves when they return to full activity and sports.

If you haven’t been able to maintain some level of activity, now is the time to start EASING your way into more exercise. Start with walks on flat, even ground for 10-15 minutes. As you feel more comfortable, make walks longer and start adding in hills and rougher terrain, then add some spurts of jogging.

If your dog has had an injury in the past or has joint pain or stiffness, passive range of motion (PROM) is a great way to get those joints loosened up and feeling good again. To do this, put one hand on each side of the joint and slowly move through the full but comfortable PROM for 30 to 60 seconds. There’s no need to force or stretch anything. DO NOT “BICYCLE” A LIMB. Most dogs don’t like this and it’s not a natural movement; focus on one joint at at time.

Core strength and joint stability are the keys to minimizing injury. Isometric exercises, where muscles are contracted but not changing length, are low impact and very effective—for example, balancing on an unstable surface like an air mattress or other inflatable. Leg lifts are another easy exercise. Start by lifting one leg at a time. Don’t lift too high, and do keep the limb in the plane of the body. Hold each one long enough that your dog has to stabilize himself, but not so long that he starts to fall over. If very wobbly, keep a hand under the belly to steady your dog. Progressions are holding the limbs longer, doing diagonal limbs at the same time, then going to both limbs on the same side. ALWAYS make sure you exercise on non-slip footing, but you can progress from the flat to unstable surfaces.

5What are some exercises I can do with my dog to prevent future injury?

Contributor: Lisa DosPassos, Certified Canine Rehabilitation Practitioner

Club and Region: Lisa is the captain of Revolution Flyball and runs in Region 15

Lisa with Max

Keeping your canine athlete fit and strong goes a long way in injury prevention. While the nature of many dog sports makes it impossible to prevent all injuries, we can take steps to reduce the likelihood of them occurring due to repetitive stress and compressive activities.

As we attempt to keep our dogs fit during this unexpected downtime, and as we prepare to start back up with training, the main goals are strength and mobility. Building and maintaining strength and mobility in three areas—your dog’s core, limbs and spine—are helpful for both optimal performance and prevention of injury.

CORE

Exercises and activities that focus on engaging the muscles of both the abdomen and spine of the dog are helpful for improving core strength.

Some exercises that are beneficial include:

Planking: Have your dog place both front feet on the floor, slightly forward of their natural stance, and reach their back feet to a surface just beyond their natural stance. Be careful not to over stretch your dog in this position, or the focus will be on limb stability rather than core engagement. Start with the dog targeting marks on flat ground (dots, tape, etc.) and progress to raised, stable surfaces (step, rubber bowl upside down) and then raised dynamic surfaces (inflatables or foam cushions). Be sure to stabilize any surface or material that the dog will be standing on. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.

Leg Lifts: With your dog in a stable standing stance, slowly lift one leg off the floor, being careful to not pull the limb away from the body. Start with one leg, and have the dog hold this for 5 to 10 seconds. Repeat for each leg. To increase the challenge, lift one leg from the floor, and once the dog is stable, slowly lift the diagonal opposite leg, (example, right rear leg and front left leg). Hold the stance for 5 to 10 seconds. You can increase the challenge by having them standing on a dynamic surface such as an inflatable or on a large piece of foam matting. Be sure to keep the surface from shifting while your dog is standing and balancing.

LIMBS

Diagonal Leg Lifts

Strengthening the limbs includes challenging both the large muscles as well as the smaller stabilizing muscles. Routinely performing range of motion exercises with your dog through all the joints of the legs, including the toes, will also alert you to any changes that may need attention.

Side Stepping: Guide your dog to step sideways:

Flat surface – side step in a heel position, or by guiding with a cookie or by using your body to guide. Add small poles such as agility jump poles, wrapping paper rolls or pool noodles for your dog to step over.

Raised surface – place your dog’s front feet or back feet onto a large rubber bowl, disc or a travel board, and guide them to step to one side and then the other.

Bows: Teach your dog to bow with their front end. Start on the floor, and to increase the challenge, progress to having the dog’s back feet on a surface a few inches in height. This is a great shoulder and front end exercise.

Sit to Stands: Position your dog in a corner and ask them to sit. Then ask them to break, stand, or get up (whichever command you normally use). Try to limit you dog from stepping forward while moving into the stand position. This will focus their effort on the hind end. Increase the challenge by having the dog stand with front feet up on a raised surface.

Range of Motion: Routinely take some time to move all of the joints of the limbs, from toes up to the body, through a full range of motion. Be sure to move each individual toe, bending and straightening each segment. A stiff or sore toe can create big problems either immediately or over time. If you notice any heat or reaction from your dog as you move any joint, compare it to the other side/limb and alert your rehab professional for further assessment.

Sore toes can can create big problems…

SPINE

Spinal mobility and strength are integral to your dog’s health and fitness throughout their lifetime. Plank exercises and swimming can strengthen both your dog’s spinal muscles and stabilizers. Try the following stretches and movement exercises to help facilitate mobility and detect any limitations or difficulties which may need to be addressed.

Cookie Stretches: Lure your dog with cookies for these three neck/upper spine exercises:

Head Turns – Stand over your dog and gently “anchor” them around the waist area with your legs. Lure them to bring their head back towards their hip on each side, and reward them with a treat. Go back to neutral, and then lure them again, this time moving their nose towards their knee on each side. Finally, lure their head toward the floor or their toes. Note any hesitancy or difficulty from one side to the other.

Head Up/Head Down – Lure your dog to raise his head upward toward the ceiling, and then bring the treat down towards their sternum, moving your hand under and through their front legs. Hold this position for a few seconds as the dog tries to get the treat from your hand.

Side-to-side Neck Movement – With your dog seated in front of you, move the cookie slightly toward the front of their shoulder on each side, to encourage them to turn and move the upper part of their spine/neck.

Figure 8 or Leg Weaving: Lure or guide your dog to move in a figure-8 pattern on the floor, or to weave between your legs. Repeat several times in each direction. This is a good exercise to incorporate as a pre-run warm-up.

Zipper: “Zip” down your dog’s spine before they run. Hold your thumb against the side of your index finger (like you would hold a key), and before your dog goes for a run (down the course, for a recall, etc.), gently “zip” your hand down along the spine. This can bring blood flow to the spinal muscles and can also alert you to any sore areas. This technique is especially good for adult and senior dogs.

‘Zipper’ back massage technique

This is the final article in the two-part series on canine fitness in the time of our hiatus from flyball. Thank you to all our contributors: Joy Adiletta,
Keri Evers-McQuiggan, Lorraine Messier, April Pelletier and
Lisa DosPassos for providing invaluable information about how to keep our dogs fit and ready to return to flyball.

Hopefully these two articles inspire you to enjoy some quality one-on-one time with your dog doing some fitness exercises. Although, like us, most dogs would love to be in the lanes right now, just being with us is what they crave most. Until we can all see each other in the lanes again, stay safe. Go flyball!

Maintaining Canine Fitness During Flyball Hiatus – PART 1 of 2

Authors: Joy Adiletta, Emma Mak, Lorraine Messier, April Pelletier

How can we keep our flyball dogs fit during this time off from the sport we all love? With no tournaments, limited or no practice, not to mention restrictions on public spaces, it can be a real challenge. We approached some of our members that are professionals in the canine fitness and rehab field for some advice. The advice given here deals with general exercises, and should not be taken as specific medical advice for your dog.

We broke this topic down into six common questions and divided the content into two articles. This is Part 1 of 2 and deals with a weekly program for keeping your dog fit, activities/exercises for small spaces, and taught behaviors geared specifically for puppy fitness!

Thanks to our knowledgeable contributors for the great input! Is there a topic you would like to see addressed? Or maybe you’d like to be a guest author? Let us know at cc@flyball.org if you have an idea for an article or would like to contribute.

1How do I keep my dog fit when I have limited space (indoors or in my backyard)?

Contributor: Joy Adiletta, CCFT in Seattle, WA

Club and Region: Joy runs with Engage Flyball in Region 7

Joy has been a CCFT since the program’s inception in 2016 and owns Ready on the Line Canine Fitness Training. She is owner/captain of Engage Flyball, and currently races with Ezri (HOBBES), Sirella (FGdCh40K) and Sarek (puppy in training)

Requirements: Indoor or outdoor 10′ x 10′ space; Equipment: Stool, padded surface.

It can be a challenge to keep your dog fit in small spaces, especially in the current COVID-19 situation where shared larger spaces may be inaccessible. You can do some simple exercises at home with minimal equipment that will help keep your dog fit. Make sure care is taken to ensure good form (not as easy with the busy, fast dogs!) Give these exercises a try, and see if you can think of other ones to add on once you’ve mastered them—or contact a certified canine fitness trainer (look for the CCFT or CPCFT certifications) for more help!

  1. Tuck Sit to Kickback Stand with Stool – Have the dog place their front paws up on the stool and then bring their rear to a tuck sit, hold for reward, then have them kick their hind feet back into a stand. This works the rear end and the core, as having the front paws up ensures weight-bearing in the rear, and the movements utilize the core muscles.
  2. Pivot with Stool – Have the dog place their front paws up on the stool and then pivot around the stool with their back legs (go in both directions!) For best results, the dog should move their rear feet independently, not just shuffle in reaction to your lure or body pressure. Advanced dogs can also step over stationary objects around the stool. This exercise is great for rear end strength and agility, as well as better body awareness.
  3. Roll Over on Padded Surface – The twisting motion that our dogs go through in a box turn is called transverse motion, and it’s one of the hardest ones to work outside of flyball. Teaching a slow and controlled Roll Over (on a padded surface for comfort—a rug or yoga mat is great) is the simplest way to work those muscles. Be sure to teach it in both directions, and keep it slow and controlled to get the most benefit out of the exercise.
  4. Spin/Turn & Leg Weaves – Spin/Turn is simply having the dog turn in a circle with a flat back, ideally slowly and on command, without a lure. Many dogs like to spin really fast, or spin and land in a sit, so take the time to train a slow movement that keeps the dog in a stand at the end. Remember to teach both directions! This exercise helps with spinal flexibility and body awareness. Once your dog does spin and turn well, you can progress to leg weaves. Leg weaves are great for warming up and focusing before going into the flyball ring, too, so will be helpful when we return to competition!
Sirella and Sarek – demonstration of Roll Over and Spin/Turn

2What are some suggestions for fitness activities for puppies and young dogs (under than 15 months)?

Contributor: April Pelletier CVT, CCFT, FP-MT in Pembroke, MA

Club and Region: April runs with Mass Chaos in Region 13

April has five dogs that are either playing flyball or in training to compete.

Many of us have puppies right now (including myself!) and we are looking for ways to keep them active with age-appropriate activities. Fitness activities are a great way to work your puppy’s mind and body, and you don’t need much time or fancy equipment!

The most important thing you can do with your puppy fitness-wise is to teach them body awareness. This is a critical skill for all our flyball dogs, not only to help prevent injury, but also to improve performance. Simple activities like teaching your puppy to walk over poles (cavalettis), pivot work, backing up, and teaching them a rear foot target are just a few of the many body-awareness activities you can do to benefit your puppy.

For this article I’m going to provide instruction on how to begin teaching your puppy two important foundation behaviors: how to pivot and how to tuck sit!

For teaching the pivot you will need something stable and fairly low to the ground for your puppy to put their front feet on (try a rubber feed bowl, placed upside down.) It is important to make sure whatever prop you choose won’t move around on the ground while your puppy is stepping on it. It’s also crucial that your pup has a non-slip surface while pivoting. I recommend putting down a yoga mat (or two) on the ground, if needed. Check out this video:

Foundations for Pivoting

We can also teach our puppies some foundation behaviors for fitness that will help them with more advanced fitness exercises as they get older. Taught behaviors such as tucks sits, folding downs, kickback stands and rockback sits are useful for this and also build body awareness.

For teaching your puppy a tuck sit you will need a low, stable, non-slip object that is large enough for your puppy to comfortably fit all four feet on (I recommend a balance pad which you get on Amazon, but you can also use a couch cushion or a memory foam dog bed). Again, we want to make sure the floor surface isn’t slippery, so put down some yoga mats if needed. Here is a video on teaching a puppy to tuck sit:

Foundations for Tuck Sit

We have only just grazed the surface of the many fitness activities you can do with your puppy! If you are interested in learning more about canine fitness for your puppy or adult dog, please visit www.newenglandk9athlete.com or follow us on Facebook.

3What is a good weekly program for keeping my flyball dog fit during these times?

Contributor: Lorraine Messier, Owner/Trainer at Canine New England, Inc., in Walpole, MA

Club and Region: Lorraine runs with Patriot Flyball, Region 13

Lorraine has been playing Flyball in Region 13 since before it was an official region! She started with a club called Jumpmasters and recently launched a new club called Patriot Flyball. She is also a NAFA Judge.

Fitness fundamentals start with very basic behaviors. This allows you and your dog to develop a system of understanding and identifying proper behavior, and how to use verbal cues and rewards effectively.

If we start back at the beginning . . . did you teach your dog to sit first? How did the dog sit? Most dogs learn by following a treat at the nose, following the treat upward and backward until the butt touches the ground and . . . BAM! we give them a cookie. By not identifying clearly the behavior we want, your dog may have ended up with a lazy sit to the side, each foot pointing east and west, with their knees up near their ribs! Let’s start at the beginning so we can train those muscles to support the hind end and core throughout your flyball dog’s lifetime.

If you and your dog are new to fitness fundamentals, here is a list of seven routines to teach—a new one for each day of the week! Typically we practice a routine of two reps, three to five times (2 rep., 3-5x) with a break in between.

Some dogs may already have many of these behaviors and should work towards practicing each of these three to five times (3-5x) within a single session every day. This would equate to roughly 20 minutes (including breaks in between). Given the drive of flyball dogs, this should be an easy place to start.

DAY 1: Tuck Sit

Work this exercise on the flat. Front feet should be stationary while bringing the rear feet forward. Butt/hips are to be square with the shoulders.

DAY 2: Kickback Stand

Once again, this is done on the flat. This exercise is great for building core, hind end and belly. Work on a tuck sit to kickback stand as part of your routine.

DAY 3: Play Bow into a Sphynx Lie-Down

This can be three exercises in one: ask for a play bow, unfold to a stand; play bow into a down (Sphynx position); and back to stand.

DAY 4: Backing Up

Get your dog stepping backwards in a straight line.

DAY 5: Pivot

This works best from a raised platform. Get your dog in a straight stance in front of you with front feet on a platform and work the pivot using your body pressure, stepping left and right; hind feet are stepping both clockwise and counterclockwise.

DAY 6: Full Body Stretch

Using a raised platform (for example, edge of the couch), get the dog’s front feet on the platform with their rear feet on the floor. Encourage stretching upward while ensuring the top line of the dog remains straight (do not let your dog arch their neck backward over the spine!)

DAY 7: Figure-8 Through Legs

Slow rotation is best to encourage each step.

This seven-day routine can be made more challenging by using a slant board to enable greater weight distribution to the hind end.

This concludes Part ONE of our TWO-part series.

Thank you to Joy, Lorraine and April for their contributions to this article! Part 2 of this series will be coming shortly and addresses two more areas of canine fitness in the time of our hiatus from flyball: how to keep your veteran dog fit and healthy, and suggestions for exercises to prevent injuries in the future.

While we are all missing flyball, may you and your canine athletes stay healthy and safe until we can get back in the lanes once again!

BOTC Flyball (Bloomington Obedience Training Club) – Region 3 (Bloomington, MN)

botcflyball@gmail.com

BOTC Flyball Facebook page

https://botcmn.org/training/flyball/

BOTC Flyball believes there is a place in Flyball for every dog, no matter the breed or speed. We believe in playing Flyball for FUN! – having fun as a team, with our local Flyball community and most importantly, having fun with our dogs!!

We are a small group of friends with a passion for the sport. Most of us train & compete in other sports together including: Obedience/Rally, Agility, Barn Hunt and Lure Coursing! We always encourage and cheer each other on, no matter what sport we are playing.

Reborn!

BOTC Flyball was registered with NAFA as club #31 on 3/15/1999, and remained active for over ten years before the program was discontinued at BOTC. After a ten year hiatus, five club members came together to breathe new life into the team. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, the team was reborn!

We are currently a small club but, we are looking to grow! We do offer flyball classes twice a year (fall/winter & spring). Those interested in classes can reach us at botcflyball@gmail.com for information on the next class session.

Matsqui Flyball and Agility Club – Region 7 (Abbotsford, British Columbia)

http://mfacdogs.com

MFAC Facebook Page

Matsqui Flyball and Agility Club practices in Abbotsford, British Columbia. We hosted our first Flyball tournament in May 1991. We pride ourselves in creating an enjoyable team experience for dogs and handlers. As a result, our team has grown significantly in the past few years. We recruit and train throughout the year working with both rookie and experienced dogs and handlers. At MFAC our members range in age and we welcome Jr. Handlers to participate. Many of our members compete in other dog sports including dog agility, urban mushing, and nose work.

 Our club presents demos for the public throughout the year. We especially like festival events such as Canada Day as many of our dogs love showing off, getting cheers, and meeting their fans. As much as we love to have fun, we also get serious about competing. We travel to tournaments throughout Western Canada and the USA to let the fur fly. Several of our team dogs have achieved their Grand Champion status.

If you would like to learn more about Matsqui Flyball and Agility Club please visit http://mfacdogs.com or visit http://facebook.com/mfacdogs

Diamonds in the Ruff Flyball – Region 8 (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan)

www.diamondsflyball.ca

Diamonds in the Ruff Flyball Team Facebook Page

diamondsflyball@gmail.com

Diamonds in the Ruff Flyball Club was founded in September 2001 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. We are a fun, enthusiastic group of people who come together to play a game that we and our dogs love – flyball!!

Diamonds in the Ruff is dedicated to improving the life of man’s best friend, the dog. By participating in Flyball, offering training classes, promoting responsible pet ownership, and engaging in community activities (including rescue events), we demonstrate the true passion and dedication we hold for this sport and man’s best friend. Diamonds in the Ruff also promotes the sport of Flyball by setting an example of team spirit, cohesiveness, and fun at both practice and at tournaments for all participants. We believe that it takes an entire village to train a flyball dog.

We advocate using positive reinforcement (reward-based training) and setting the dog up for success to teach our dogs. We reinforce desired behaviours with verbal, food and play rewards. This ensures that learning the sport is fun for both dog and handler! We do not use any form of punishment.

Finn & Sophie flying…

Diamonds in the Ruff does not support any form of Breed Specific Legislation. Flyball is a dog sport that any dog and handler should be able to participate in. Breed Specific Legislation DOES NOT protect people from dog bites or dangerous dogs. Only responsible pet ownership and holding owners response for their dog’s actions will change the statistics.

We love to socialize after tournaments, either at a restaurant or campsite and our snack table at tournaments is so good. We love escape rooms!! Our members are really creative and crafty with lots of home made items on our fantastic raffle tables including home made quilts! We have have awesome “pit crews” that are so efficient and maximize our warm up time at tournaments. We also promote the participation of our junior handlers.

We are the fastest team in SK: 15.268. Our club had the 1st dog to earn an ONYX in Saskatoon. His name was Lugnut (a great dane/Chesapeake Bay retriever mix). We have the highest pointed #41 Australian Kelpie, #21 Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, #11 Sheltland Sheepdog and #9 Whippet (retired). We also host the largest flyball tournament in the prairies!

Our team practices every Saturday in the Fall and Winter and on Tuesday nights during the Spring and Summer. Practices involve exercises which are geared specifically to the individual dog to aid in their training, as well as team specific training. Our training goals are geared towards excellence in techniques to enable dogs to succeed both safely and to the best of their abilities.

We run classes during the winter and are accepting new students and members at this time. Our current classes are: Relationship building and Sports Foundation (2 sessions) starting Oct 27, 2019 and Beginner Flyball starting Nov 26, 2019. Check our website and contact us for our latest classes.

Blockade Runners – Region 9 (Wendell, Cedar Grove & Julian, NC)

www.blockaderunnersflyball.com

Blockade Runners Flyball Facebook Page

The Blockade Runners were founded in Raleigh, North Carolina in 1996 by Mike Randall. Mike was originally with the Front Runners Flyball team, which is based out of Michigan. Mike Randall wrote the first NAFA Rule Book in 1985, and was also the first NAFA Executive Director.

Competing at the Coconut Classic

Being a team player is really important to the Blockade Runners Flyball Team! We have some rules:

  1. While participation in practice, demos to the public and tournaments is not mandatory, having fun is!
  2. No drama.
  3. Positive dog training is a requirement – have fun with your dog!
  4. Everyone has input into lineups and seed times for team, but once they are submitted, no whining!

Everyone is welcome to attend our practices! Regardless if you are new to the sport, or if you are already playing flyball with another team, everyone’s welcome. All dog breeds and mixes are also welcome. We do not charge for our practices. We have many years of experience, and can help you train your dog. We have chosen not to host classes that require payment as we simply enjoy the sport and don’t want to get into charging for training.

At the NAFA’s CanAm…the biggest tournament in the world!

The Man Behind the New EJS Start Lights

Get to Know NAFA People – Dave Thomas, the ‘Flying Nerd’


The first in a series designed to let readers know some of the people behind the scenes at NAFA

by Emma Mak, NAFA Communications Committee
Dave Thomas with his flying pup, Cassie, on the wing of his Cirrus SR22

NAFA is incredibly thankful to have Dave Thomas, a Go Dog Go! member from North Carolina, as a technical consultant on the Technology Committee. Some of you may recognize Dave as the person behind the APES (Automatic Pass Evaluator System) used in the Championship rings at NAFA’s CanAm Flyball Classic. 

In 2018, Dave created a prototype for new start lights (light trees) donating all his engineering time, which could have easily cost many thousands of dollars, and charging NAFA only for the cost of parts. NAFA’s goals for new development of EJS include reduction of overall cost, easily replaceable parts, and an eye towards reducing shipping costs as supplier rates continue to escalate. These are all things Dave delivered in his prototype for the start lights.  They’ve since been tested alongside the current lights at multiple events in the East and Midwest with great success. Now, NAFA is a few months away from having five new EJS start light sets, ready to replace existing sets as they fail.

New EJS Start Lights

The new lights offer the following features:

– one horizontal light instead of two vertical ones, saving space and reducing weight for shipping

– use an affordable, readily available 20V battery that can be charged in 1 hour

– low cost, easily replaceable parts – including LED light strips, Raspberry Pi computer

– flexibility in terms of how the lights can be programmed to work and look

The Technology Committee was initially concerned that competitors would find the horizontal configuration of the lights too different from the original, but as Jonathan Bescher, NAFA Supervising Judge in Region 9 explains, “It took a few heats to get used to the horizontal flow of the lights, but once you saw it,  it was very easy to adjust.” He adds, “The feedback I have heard from competitors has all been positive. With the lights not hanging down from the poles, it allows more room and visibility to see the time displays behind the box loaders.” Flags and lane wins are indicated by red lights or green flashing lights at the far end of each side (left for flag left lane, right for flag right lane, etc.).

Start Lights in action…*

* NOTE:
The brightness of the lights in this video is not true to life, due to camera exposure settings. During tests, the New EJS Start Lights were found to be as bright, or brighter than existing lights.

As NAFA looks to the future of the EJS, Dave would like to totally eliminate the need for head table workers and work toward fully automated, real time tournament scoring. Line judge time sheets could be replaced with software on tablets. Dave has already written software for this (the “Stats Helper” application) that obtains times from the EJS, and line judges need to only define run order and confirm race result. Lighter, thinner time displays, as well as moving away from Farmtek’s custom designed hardware to off-the-shelf hardware and open source software where possible, are all being discussed.

So, who is Dave Thomas? Dave retired from a 35-year career at IBM, including 15 years as a chip designer and 15 years of software development of C++ and kernel level C debuggers. 

In Dave’s own words (Warning: highly technical content ahead), “Projects included DRAM , numerous analog, and microprocessor designs. I got a patent for the first NMOS, non-volatile RAM cell—a big deal before CMOS technology was affordable.  I also spent several years designing high frequency DC/DC convertors and the chip to make the designs possible.  I share a patent for the first 1 Mhz, monolithic DC/DC convertor chip (along with several of my co-workers).” 

Later he did the hardware design for the for worldwide compatible modem for the Thinkpad machines. He adds, “Back then, countries had widely varied regulatory requirements which drove many unique hardware designs. My ‘universal’ design had programmable electrical characteristics so a single hardware design could pass regulatory requirements in all countries.”

It’s okay if you didn’t understand all of the above two paragraphs, you’re not alone. To say Dave has an absolute passion for all things technical would be an understatement. In his retirement, his enthusiasm hasn’t dwindled in the least. “Now I do embedded hardware and software development for fun. I just love writing code in any language! It’s instant gratification versus chip design.”

With his penchant for riding electric unicycles and being a licensed commercial drone operator, as Dave would be the first to admit, he tends towards super geeky pursuits . . . but he and his wife, Sandy, also a former engineer at IBM, have plenty of decidedly non-nerd hobbies, including skiing, scuba diving, and hiking in Montana. And if you ask Dave how he got into flyball he’ll tell you, “It was a good excuse to fly! Flying to a flyball tournament was a nice alternative to a weekend trip for a $100 hamburger.” Dave is also an instrument-rated pilot and owns his own plane, a Cirrus SR22. 

Having a similar Cirrus airplane saved Dave’s life in 2016, when he survived a crash with “only a collapsed T12 vertebra.” The Cirrus is special for having a ballistic parachute system.  Due to engine power loss during that flight, Dave as pilot was able to take quick action, pulling an emergency handle which launched a rocket which then deployed a parachute, allowing the whole plane to safely descend to the ground.

See a nail-biting demonstration of this feature in the above brief video

The future of NAFA EJS looks bright, in huge part thanks to Dave’s generous contributions of hours of time and brain power. Ask Dave if he has any answers for a technical issue and he’ll rapidly provide myriad detailed and innovative solutions. Not only does he generate creative ideas, he quickly hones in on the most practical solution, and with NAFA’s go-ahead, gets the work done. 

Dave plans to bring a new start light set to CanAm 2019 for demonstration to interested flyballers. You can find him near the Pit Boss area . . . if he’s not off somewhere riding his electric unicycle or racing with Go Dog Go!

Power UN-leashed Flyball – Region 3 (Minneapolis, Minnesota)

Celebrating some new flyball titles with cake!

Power UN-leashed Flyball Club

Power UN-leashed Flyball Club practices at Twin Cities Obedience Training Club in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We are a small club that right now has seven Border Collies, an Australian Shepherd and four mixes. We are all great friends and enjoy participating in tournaments in Minnesota and Wisconsin. We’re in flyball for our dogs to have fun, and in return we have a BLAST!

The first title is a very important one!

We offer a six week class for $120. Contact us through our Facebook page and get started today.

Capital Flyers – Region 15 (Silver Spring, MD)

Capital Flyers after our win at CanAm – NAFA’s Premier Annual Event in Indianapolis, IN

https://cdtc.org

Email Contact: Dona Dwyer at ddildon@aol.com

Capital Flyers is one of the first and oldest flyball teams located in Silver Spring, Maryland. Our team was first started when after a trip to Texas, Neil Jennings found out what the wonderful game of flyball was all about. We started training our dogs shortly after that. Back then, we used tuna/cat food cans on the end of a wooden pole and the box had a small trigger plate on the front. Mind you this was in 1983, before outdoor lights and training facilities! Flyball boxes have come a long way since then. As the years have passed, we have had teams split off from Capital Flyers and No Speed Limit. Now there are 15 teams across Maryland and Virginia that play flyball. 

Currently, we are looking for new members to create another team. As mentioned previously, we practice in Silver Spring, Maryland. Practice is held Saturday night at the Capital Dog Training Clubhouse (CDTC). Each session is eight weeks and costs $100 for non-CDTC members. For additional questions, please contact Dona Dwyer at ddildon@aol.com. More info about flyball as well as CDTC can be found on this website https://cdtc.org

Hoping to race with you soon!

Tampa Bay Barkaneers – Region 11 (St. Petersburg, Florida)

www.dtcsp.org

Contact Email: flyballmom@yahoo.com

Tampa Bay Barkaneers Facebook page

Tampa Bay Barkaneers was established in 2007 and is one of the longest running active clubs in Florida. We train at The Dog Training Club of St. Petersburg, St Petersburg, Florida.

Our goals has always been to have fun…and we do! Our members pull together, support each other and help each other to train and compete. Being a team is what makes flyball unique as a dog sport. It is this TEAMWORK that makes the Barkaneers such a great team!

Outside of the flyball lanes, we like our dogs to be versatile and members have earned titles in Agility, Conformation, Dock Diving, Obedience, Rally, FASTCat and Barn Hunt.

Tampa Bay Barkaneers in action!

We offer regular, weekly ‘Intro to Flyball’ Classes and our Team Flyball Practice is held on Sunday evenings. Contact us at the above links to find out times and confirm availability.

Arizona Supercharged Flyball – Region 6 (Gilbert, Arizona)

Team members celebrating with a dinner, following a 1st place finish in an out of state tournament.

www.ArizonaSupercharged.com

azsc.flyball@gmail.com

Arizona Supercharged Flyball Team Facebook page

Arizona Supercharged Flyball promotes inclusivity and fun on our club – we are friends first, and work together to train and compete. We use the most up-to-date training methods to get the most out of all our dogs. Our club captains attend seminars consistently and also participate in online training with some of the top flyball competitors in North America.

Small dogs, large dogs, unusual breeds are all welcome – we currently have the following dog breeds on our club: Border Collie, Australian Shepherd, Jack Russell Terrier, Belgian Malinois, German Shepherd, Chihuahua, Shiba Inu, American Pit Bull Terrier and also sport bred mixes and rescued mixes. We often accept re-trains as well, and place a lot of emphasis on proper technique.

Flyball demo at an Arizona Rattlers Arena Football Game with another local club.

Our club enjoys scrimmages with other local clubs and hanging out outside of flyball. Other activities we enjoy together include team dinners, parties, game nights, dock diving, kayaking and disc. We attend all local tournaments and often travel to surrounding states 2-3 times a year as well.

Arizona Supercharged Flyball is celebrating over 10 years together! We are looking for goal-oriented people, who enjoy a team environment, that want to share in this fun, high-adrenaline sport with us, to send us a message or email. Contact us at our Facebook page listed above, or drop us an email to find out more about flyball and how to get started with lessons!

Small, medium, and large dogs are all welcome to enjoy the exciting sport of flyball!

Pawmetto Pack Flyball – Region 9 (Florence, South Carolina)

Pawmetto Pack Facebook page

www.pawmettopack.com

pp.flyball@gmail.com

Founded in 2002, Pawmetto Pack is a small flyball club looking to grow. Our positive-based training sessions include dogs at many different levels of learning at the same time. We welcome all breeds and sizes and really most enjoy our junior handlers – we foster a family atmosphere.

Many members of our Pack enjoy other sports and challenges with their dogs: field work, dock diving, disc, barn hunt, obedience, rally, agility and conformation. We also have certified therapy dogs in our club, visiting nursing homes and other facilities. Even though we have members in North Carolina and areas well outside Florence, we enjoy gathering together to support all our teammates and have fun.

We currently host the only tournaments in South Carolina, one in December and on in February. We regularly travel to tournaments in Virginia, North Carolina, and Georgia, and have participated in the NAFA-hosted October CanAm tournament in Indianapolis, Indiana, as well. Occasionally, a team member of two will travel to other eastern states to participate in tournaments.

Our mission is to have fun with our dogs and each other. We believe each dog and handler is an important part of our Club. We support each other throughout the positive training process and into the tournament setting. We celebrate each and every milestone our dog and handler teams reach – and have a lot of fun doing it! Our dogs steadily earn points to gain higher titles, but it’s the joy of the game and participating with each other that makes us winners! We are proud to say we have Iron Dogs (Ten consecutive years of running NAFA Flyball) as members of our Club!

We offer free demonstrations of this awesome sport to any and all that ask. We have provided demos to the Florence Humane Society, Health South (rehab facility), the River Jamboree at Lynches River State Park and Central United Methodist Church, as well as dog training facilities in Myrtle Beach and North Carolina, and the Santa Paws Dog Pageant at Grand Dunes in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

Contact us at the pp.flyball@gmail.com if you’d like to learn more about Flyball and become part of our Pack!

Mutter Chaos – Region 21 (Des Moines, IA)

mutterchaos@gmail.com

Mutter Chaos Flyball Facebook page

Mutter Chaos Flyball Club has been Bringing The Chaos in Des Moines, Iowa (Region 21) since 2016. The philosophy of Mutter Chaos Flyball Club is to give our dogs an outlet for their abundance of energy, and have fun doing so. We strive for each handler and dog to perform at the best of their ability. We do not limit membership to those dogs who have the greatest potential – we’re open to all. Flyball can provide an outlet to dogs of any breed and skill level. The goal is to build a stronger relationship between handler and dog.

We have had a variety of pure breeds and rescue dogs run with our team, including Weimaraners, Australian Shepherds, Miniature Schnauzers, German Wirehair Pointers, German Shorthair Pointers, a Swedish Valhund, a Field Spaniel, Huskies, a Dutch Shepherd, Border Collies, and mixes. All are welcome!

Our club enjoys sharing our love of Flyball with the community. We have performed a number of Flyball demos in support of Puppy Up (Companions Against Cancer), the Great Iowa Pet Expo, and even on center ice (with carpets and mats) for the Iowa Wild Pucks N Paws Night in support of the Animal Rescue League.

Mutter Chaos humans and dogs enjoy a variety of activities together in addition to Flyball. In summer 2019, several of our dog/handler pairs earned a variety of Do More With Your Dog(R) trick titles. We also enjoy occasional backyard agility training, backyard flyball/dog romp sessions, and even doggie birthday parties. The humans also enjoy getting together for social activities such as corn mazes, game nights, ‘Friendsgiving’, and more.

Find us on Facebook @mutterchaosflyball or contact us at mutterchaos@gmail.com

Region 18 – Alaska

Check out the NAFA Locator for contact info for clubs in this region. The Regional Director contact info can also be found there, and is a good resource for finding flyballers to get you started.

If you are a NAFA Flyball club that would like to be featured here, please email CC@flyball.org and/or fill out this form.

Go Flyball!

Region 17 – Hawaii

Check out the NAFA Locator for contact info for clubs in this region. The Regional Director contact info can also be found there, and is a good resource for finding flyballers to get you started.

If you are a NAFA Flyball club that would like to be featured here, please email CC@flyball.org and/or fill out this form.

Go Flyball!